Our new meter reading at World Water Day 2020

As every year, we will also announce this year on World Water Day how many liters of clean drinking water we have been able to realize since our inception. This year, of course, the world is all about the Corona crisis, but it actually makes it even clearer how important access to clean drinking water and hygiene is.

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litres

How much is that?

6.3 billion liters sound like a lot of water, but how much is it really? Converted, it means that we:

  • 86261people getting
  • 20litres of water a day during at least
  • 10years or longer

20 litres a day

That is enough for a person in a developing country to drink, cook and wash safely. We base this on a United Nations standard. That 20 litres is really the minimum because in fact 50 to 100 litres of water would be needed to stay healthy and safe.

In practice, we calculate the number of people who have access to water in our projects and multiply that by the standard of 20 litres. In practice, it may well be that we make many more litres available than our meter reading indicates.

For at least 10 years

We calculate with 10 years of access, but we do everything we can to make it 100 years in practice. For example, with every project we provide a maintenance committee with members from the local community and people often have to pay a small contribution so that savings can be made for maintenance and repairs.

We choose to work in relatively stable regions where there are no conflicts that can threaten the water supply. We also include a risk margin in our calculations if something should go wrong.